The Handmaid's Tale

Dystopia, Novel by Margaret Atwood

Blurb

A gripping vision of our society radically overturned by a theocratic revolution, Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid's Tale has become one of the most powerful and most widely read novels of our time.

Offred is a Handmaid in the Republic of Gilead, serving in the household of the enigmatic Commander and his bitter wife. She may go out once a day to markets whose signs are now pictures because women are not allowed to read. She must pray that the Commander makes her pregnant, for in a time of declining birthrates her value lies in her fertility, and failure means exile to the dangerously polluted Colonies. Offred can remember a time when she lived with her husband and daughter and had a job, before she lost even her own name. Now she navigates the intimate secrets of those who control her every move, risking her life in breaking the rules.

Like Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World and George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four, The Handmaid's Tale has endured not only as a literary landmark but as a warning of a possible future that is still chillingly relevant.

First Published

1985

Member Reviews Write your own review

ashitha

Ashitha

You will, in equal parts, enjoy the book, squirm uncomfortably, and be horrified when you read it!

0 Responses posted in September
kristen.kreashko

Kristen.kreashko

I didn't like it. Yes, I can see the point it was trying to make. And yes, the concept did truly scare me. It was so surreal at times because I could definitely picture these things happening in society. As a woman, this book unnerved me. However, this book was so oddly written. It used a weird prose, half poetic, half lazy and blunt. The story felt disjointed and all over the place. Also, why does the author hate quotation marks so badly? What did they ever do to her? I struggled to get through this. I wanted to give up several times but I was just waiting for it to get better. It never did really. The conclusion was very unsatisfying. This book was upsetting. Also, I'm not really sure why this is considered a feminist book when it doesn't really seem like the women ever came out on top. Whatever we do, don't let Trump read this book. I don't want him getting any ideas.

0 Responses posted in August
minda.whiteley.1

Minda.whiteley.1

I love this book

0 Responses posted in February
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