Anne of Green Gables

Novel by Lucy Maud Montgomery
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Blurb

When Marilla and Matthew Cuthbert of Green Gables, Prince Edward Island, send for a boy orphan to help them out at the farm, they are in no way prepared for the error that will change their lives. The mistake takes the shape of Anne Shirley, a redheaded 11-year-old girl who can talk anyone under the table. Fortunately, her sunny nature and quirky imagination quickly win over her reluctant foster parents. Anne's feisty spirit soon draws many friends--and much trouble--her way. Not a day goes by without some melodramatic new episode in the tragicomedy of her life. Early on, Anne declares her eternal antipathy for Gilbert Blythe, a classmate who commits the ultimate sin of mocking her hair color. Later, she accidentally dyes that same cursed hair green. Another time, in her haste to impress a new neighbor, she bakes a cake with liniment instead of vanilla. Lucy Maud Montgomery's series of books about Anne have remained classics since the early 20th century. Her portrayal of this feminine yet independent spirit has given generations of girls a strong female role model, while offering a taste of another, milder time in history. This lovely boxed gift collection comprises Anne of Green Gables, Anne of the Island, Anne of Avonlea, Anne of Windy Poplars, Anne's House of Dreams, Anne of Ingleside, Rainbow Valley, and Rilla of Ingleside. (Ages 9 to 12) --Emilie Coulter

First Published

1908

Member Reviews Write your own review

tarma

Tarma

In a lifetime full of being able to reread books over and over again, Anne of Green Gables is high on my list of "books I can reread at any time." It's one of the most delicious books I've ever come across, for the writing, the atmosphere, the characters and the scenery. Anne is a loveable girl, but there are so many other characters that capture your heart that it's impossible to pick a favorite. There's Matthew, Mrs. Lynde, Marilla, Aunt Josephine... actually the weakest characters are Anne's childhood companions. I found them all rather typical and undistinguished, whereas the adult personalities fairly leap off the page with their vivid and well-written personalities. Josie Pye was actually the best of the bunch for the children. The only other weakness is the big dose of religion, which is hardly surprising considering it was published in 1908 by a woman who was engaged to a minister. It does at least try and lighten the severe religion of the adults with the dreamy, imaginative version Anne has in her own head, but it is fairly heavy-handed at times - such as when a teacher tells her children that by age 20 their characters will be fixed and pretty much implies that there's no hope of changing thereafter - what a thing to tell a child! Anyway, those weaknesses really are completely incapable of spoiling the book. It is charming, it is beautiful, and it is a wonderful book to curl up with at any time of year and revisit as with an old and faithful friend.

0 Responses posted in December
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