image of Lewis Carroll

Lewis Carroll

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Contained in this volume are the two classics by Lewis Carroll, "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" and "Through the Looking Glass." We are first introduced to Alice in "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" where we find Alice idly passing away the time next to a river when she sees a white rabbit pass by in a waistcoat. …

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I had sent my heroine straight down a rabbit-hole ...without the least idea what was to happen afterwards,' wrote Charles Dodgson, describing how Alice was conjured up one 'golden afternoon' in 1862 to entertain his child-friend Alice Liddell. His dream worlds of nonsensical Wonderland and the back-to-front …

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The Annotated Alice is a work by Martin Gardner incorporating the text of Lewis Carroll's major tales: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass as well as the original illustrations by John Tenniel. It has extensive annotations explaining the contemporary references, mathematical concepts, word …

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Alice's Adventures in Wonderland is an 1865 novel written by English author Charles Lutwidge Dodgson under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll. It tells of a girl named Alice falling through a rabbit hole into a fantasy world populated by peculiar, anthropomorphic creatures. The tale plays with logic, giving the story lasting …

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The Hunting of the Snark is typically categorized as a nonsense poem written by Lewis Carroll, the pen name of Charles Lutwidge Dodgson. Written from 1874 to 1876, the poem borrows the setting, some creatures, and eight portmanteau words from Carroll's earlier poem "Jabberwocky" in his children's novel Through the …

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This work is sometimes called the "Fascimile Edition" of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Lewis Carroll wrote, in his own hand, the story whose core elements had been told to the the three Liddell sisters, Lorina, Alice and Edith, and a friend, the Reverend Duckworth, on their boat ride on the Thames in July of 1862. …

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Why shouldn't the Jabberwocky be a fourteen-fingered, slam-dunking beast? Lewis Carroll challenged readers' imaginations with his most famous poem, "Jabberwocky". Here, Christopher Myers takes on that challenge by brilliantly re-imagining it as a face off on the basketball court. In this fresh take on the classic …

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The Hunting of the Snark is typically categorized as a nonsense poem written by Lewis Carroll, the pen name of Charles Lutwidge Dodgson. Written from 1874 to 1876, the poem borrows the setting, some creatures, and eight portmanteau words from Carroll's earlier poem "Jabberwocky" in his children's novel Through the …